Sheila Stogsdill

Special to the Grove Sun

VINITA — A Vinita doctor who prescribed more than 1,000 Demerol and OxyContin pills to a nursing instructor who died with toxic amounts of painkillers in her system has been suspended for 30 days by the Oklahoma Board of Medical Licensure and Supervision and fined $25,000.

Dr. Mickey Ray Tyrrell, 38, appeared before the board for more than three hours on Thursday, March 10, said Janet Swindle, secretary to the investigations department.

Tyrrell also was suspended for an additional 30 days but allowed to practice obstetrics, Swindle said.

Swindle said Tyrrell must perform 200 hours of community service. The suspension was effective Thursday.

Tyrrell is accused of prescribing excessive amounts of narcotics to Tammy Dawn Daniels, 35, of Vinita, who died Sept. 5, 2009, from acute combined drug toxicity from forms of the painkiller Demerol, according to an autopsy report.

Telephone calls to Tyrrell’s residence, his office and the Daniels family were not returned.

Daniels, a Northeast Technology Center nursing instructor, was being treated by a Tulsa urologist when she started seeing Tyrrell for pain management.

She asked Tyrrell for Demerol, which she told him she was taking already.

Pharmacy records from June 2, 2009, through Sept. 2, 2009, show Tyrrell prescribed 990 Demerol pills and 120 OxyContin pills.

In the last 35 days of Daniels’ life, she received 630 Demerol pills and 60 OxyContin pills, an average of 18.5 dosage units per day of Demerol, the complaint states.

Tyrrell noted only two prescriptions for Demerol in Daniels’ chart when he had written nine prescriptions, the complaint states. Tyrrell told investigators he authorized the prescriptions, but had no explanation as to why he documented only two of them, the complaint states.

District Attorney Janice Steidley was not available for comment Friday, but in an earlier interview said she planned on re-examining at the case.

Gene Haynes, who has retired from the office, declined to file criminal charges in November, saying there was no evidence of criminal violations.

“At the time of her death, the patient’s body had multiple visible injection sites,” according to the complaint.