Life is a precious thing. 

Life, especially at the beginning, is amazing. 

Think about it. A young child enters this world a bit like a blank canvas - albeit a messy, screaming one - ready to have the imprint of its parents, grandparents, siblings and other significant folks, made on its blooming personality.

Life is amazing. 

I've watched during the past few months as a seminary friend has rejoiced with her "Tiny" - a beautiful, amazing, sweet little girl.

Tina and Joe adopted Tiny. The opportunity came unexpectedly. A gift from God. Tiny's mother chose adoption and picked my friend to become Tiny's mother.

Tiny officially became "a Fox" last Wednesday. With much joy, members of both Tina and Joe's congregations came, to celebrate with their pastors and to celebrate Tiny's life.

These are the same people, who have become Tiny's extended family. They have (or will) promise at her baptism to help Tina and Joe as they navigate the ups and downs of parenthood.

It's a commitment to life that lasts well beyond utero. It's a life-long pledge.

This week, I sat in a meeting, where the speaker spoke about the political aspects of life - pro-life, pro-choice or anti-abortion depending upon how you phrase it.

It's an emotional time for some. Between the women's marches this past weekend and the 45th anniversary of Roe v. Wade, emotions are running high on both sides of the issue.

Our president has even weighed in on the conversation, naming Jan. 22 - the anniversary of the Supreme Court decision "Sanctity of Human Life Day."

I agree with that. All life is sacred.

There's a saying, it's not the day of your birth, or the day of your death, but rather, the stuff in between - the dash - that becomes important.

Life from conception to death is sacred - from a newborn "Tiny" to a seasoned adult with dementia. All life is sacred and valued. Each person regardless of age, economic status, gender - really any way you want to classify a person - should be treated with respect, grace and dignity.

This means we can't just say "don't have an abortion," and then disappear after the child is born. It means we can't ignore the family in crisis, a child in need of a safe home, or an older adult struggling to make ends meet.

It's our responsibility, no, our privilege, to walk alongside people within our spheres of influence and say "what can I do for you," or "how can I help you."

By doing this, life becomes less about "what do I get out of it," and more about "what I can do for others."

All life is sacred. All life is a gift.

How are you using your gift to help those within your community? How are you treasuring life today?

Kaylea M. Hutson-Miller is the managing editor of The Grove Sun and Delaware County Journal. Have an idea for a column or story? She can be reached at khutson@grovesun.com or 918-786-2228.